breakingbadfriends:

"When we conceived of “Breaking Bad,” we wanted to create characters who were in the process of changing. In a sense, our show is about how life — and the problems and choices it throws at us — can slowly morph us as individuals. For the most part, the violence in the story is intended to have a transforming effect on our characters.
We work in a writers’ room and the storytelling is a group effort. We go over every step of the script, beat by beat, point by point, and discuss in great detail what the characters are feeling — their hopes, their fears, their goals and obstacles — throughout the episode. That process applies to the bloody scenes as well. We consider what happens to our characters after an incident of violence. It doesn’t matter whether they were dealing it or being dealt it: We figure there will always be repercussions, consequences to the violent act, for everyone involved. How does it darken them? How does it affect their feelings and behavior from that point onward? These are questions we ask ourselves.
When filming scenes of violence, there’s always a meat-and-potatoes component to the planning. Where do we place the squib? Where should the body fall? A lot of it comes down to choreography, to “dance steps,” as it were. But there’s another element, as well. Violence and high emotions go hand-in-hand — and any emotional moment needs to be discussed thoroughly with our actors so that they can figure out how to play it. Often, they help us writers understand how it needs to be played.”
— Vince Gilligan, Breaking Bad illustrates the consequences of violence

breakingbadfriends:

"When we conceived of “Breaking Bad,” we wanted to create characters who were in the process of changing. In a sense, our show is about how life — and the problems and choices it throws at us — can slowly morph us as individuals. For the most part, the violence in the story is intended to have a transforming effect on our characters.

We work in a writers’ room and the storytelling is a group effort. We go over every step of the script, beat by beat, point by point, and discuss in great detail what the characters are feeling — their hopes, their fears, their goals and obstacles — throughout the episode. That process applies to the bloody scenes as well. We consider what happens to our characters after an incident of violence. It doesn’t matter whether they were dealing it or being dealt it: We figure there will always be repercussions, consequences to the violent act, for everyone involved. How does it darken them? How does it affect their feelings and behavior from that point onward? These are questions we ask ourselves.

When filming scenes of violence, there’s always a meat-and-potatoes component to the planning. Where do we place the squib? Where should the body fall? A lot of it comes down to choreography, to “dance steps,” as it were. But there’s another element, as well. Violence and high emotions go hand-in-hand — and any emotional moment needs to be discussed thoroughly with our actors so that they can figure out how to play it. Often, they help us writers understand how it needs to be played.”

— Vince Gilligan, Breaking Bad illustrates the consequences of violence

(via fuks)


Death of a Cyborg by Shorra

Death of a Cyborg by Shorra

(via fuks)

heathyr:

scully casually walking around a room full of human remains with a bucket of chicken

(via bruariswawa)

visualartlove:

steve martin

(Source: reddit.com, via joshuaclements)